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It is easier to build strong children than to repair broken men -- Frederick Douglass

Sep
20

2012 September Newsletter

 Uncategorized

September 12, 2012

Greetings!

Changing attitudes is like chiseling a stone into a statue on a public square. People will stop to look only when a work of art begins to emerge.  That’s how I’d describe the process of raising awareness to the plight of Haiti’s children in domestic slavery.  Instead of a hammer and chisel, my tools are a theme song, the story of my childhood, and airtime on radio and TV stations.  Since the creation of the song, I’ve done several radio shows and taken calls from hundreds of supportive listeners who thank me for giving these children a voice.  A few weeks ago, Dr. Jean-Bertrand Aristide, Haiti’s former president, called and invited me to his home. The former president said, “Because you’ve lived it and written about it, people listen when you speak about it.”  I was pleased when he offered additional airtime and administrative assistance.   After this meeting, I felt as if the statue has taken shape, and people are looking at it.  This accomplishment would not have been possible without your financial support.

Last month we donated hundreds of copies of Restavek, my first autobiography, to students and university libraries in the Port-au-Prince area.  During my presentations, some students who have children in servitude in their own homes have promised to take an interest in them and teach them how to read.

The foundation has also registered for school two dozen children in restavek situations. They are being fitted for uniforms, and will need shoes, book bags and school supplies. We spend approximately $25.00 per month on each child.  Please consider sponsoring one of them.

Thank you so much for your continuing support.

Jean-Robert Cadet


ceci Nice work.
Sep 24 at 12:00pm
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If you were a restavek child, you would most likely be:
One of an estimated 300,000 Haitian children enslaved in child labor.
If you were a restavek child, you would most likely be:
From an isolated, rural area of Haiti where there are no schools, no electricity, no running water and few possibilities for the future.
If you were a restavek child, you would most likely be:
Living in the city with a family who is not your own -- not as a foster child, but as their servant.
If you were a restavek child, you would most likely be:
Between the ages of 5 and 15, and missing out on your childhood.
If you were a restavek child, you would most likely be:
Three times more likely to be a girl than a boy.
If you were a restavek child, you would most likely be:
Up at dawn, before any member of the family you serve, to begin preparing for their day, and in bed well after most other children are asleep.
If you were a restavek child, you would most likely be:
Responsible for preparing the household meals, fetching water from the local well, cleaning inside and outside the house, doing laundry and emptying bedpans.
If you were a restavek child, you would most likely be:
Getting no pay for any of these activities.
If you were a restavek child, you would most likely be:
Unable to see your family or remember where they live.
If you were a restavek child, you would most likely be:
Unable to attend school consistently, if at all -- depending on your owner's financial situation and schedule.
If you were a restavek child, you would most likely be:
Hungry, as you would probably not get enough to eat or food with enough nutritional value for someone who works hard all day.
If you were a restavek child, you would most likely be:
Subjected to physical, emotional or sexual abuse.
If you were a restavek child, you would most likely:
Never have all of your rights as a child respected.
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